About

A note from Jonathan …

Refound is a new management philosophy based on an idea whose time has come:

Personal and professional growth are one thing, not two.

Like you, each of us struggled for many years trying to bridge the gap between our personal and professional selves. How could I make a great living in the world while feeling like I was moving closer to my authentic self at the same time?

In 2015, out of desperation, I had an epiphany.

What if it’s that very idea itself — that personal and professional growth were ever truly separate or should be — that we can’t seem to change the employee engagement numbers no matter how hard we try or how much money we spend.

What if being able to have personal growth conversations in a professionally appropriate way was the secret to:

  • Creating happy and deeply engaged employees
  • Getting managers get out of overwhelm, rework and too many meetings.
  • Embodying the values-based culture that every CEO dreams about (secretly or not!).

Refound was created to offer an alternative philosophy for leaders who are truly committed to creating a people-first culture.

While leaders play a critical role, our approach starts in the middle of the organization. By training managers to reimagine their role — from taskmaster to personal growth facilitators, and giving them practical tools to start and manage the critical conversations — our clients are accelerating the shift to a culture based on personal ownership, transparency and fostering accountability based on strengths, not shame or judgment.

We believe that every employee deserves a great boss and that a great boss is someone that helps you become a better person while you’re at work.

We also believe that the dismal employee engagement numbers tell only part of the story. When we factor in the secondary impacts of a disengaged workforce on families and communities, on individual mental and emotional health, substance abuse, and chronic illness, there’s no more urgent problem to solve.

With all the uncertainty in our world, one thing is clear: changing the lives of employees is good for business, good for the world, and, most importantly, it’s the right thing to do.

— Jonathan Raymond

Share This